Who I Work With

I specialize in therapeutic work with adolescents, young adults, and parents facing a variety of complex challenges. Below are common examples of issues facing the clients I treat see in my practice

  • Substance use and addiction
  • Anger/rage
  • Anxiety
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Gang affiliation
  • Sexually abusive behavior
  • Concerning sexual behavior
  • Pornography
  • Video game addiction
  • Bullying (being bullied or being a bully)
  • Internet, social media, and technology behavior
  • Failure to launch
  • Trauma
  • Strategic parenting coaching
  • Marital conflict
  • Adjusting to divorce
  • Step-parent conflict and integration
  • Social anxiety

Who I Work With

I specialize in work with adolescents, young adults, and parents facing a variety of complex challenges. Below are common examples of issues facing the clients I treat see in my practice

  • Substance use and addiction
  • Anger/rage
  • Anxiety
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Gang affiliation
  • Sexually abusive behavior
  • Concerning sexual behavior
  • Pornography
  • Video game addiction
  • Bullying (being bullied or being a bully)
  • Internet, social media, and technology behavior
  • Failure to launch
  • Trauma
  • Strategic parenting coaching
  • Marital conflict
  • Adjusting to divorce
  • Step-parent conflict and integration
  • Social anxiety

Additional Services

Parental Coaching

If you’re a parent with a child, regardless of their age, who is behaving in a disrespectful, obnoxious, dangerous and/or self-destructive manner, then you will need some specialized parental coaching while your child is in treatment. This is especially true if part of what we’re dealing with includes substance abuse, aggressive behavior, or sexually problematic/abusive issues. But no matter the perceived severity of the issue your child is facing, the days when parents send their children off to treatment to be “fixed” while they themselves made no changes, are long gone. Like it or not, we play a pivotal role in the behavior and overall health of our children and accepting where we do and don’t have responsibility is a vital step in this process. Examining our role in the behavior of our children and then doing everything in our power to avoid being a part of the problem just makes good sense.

When I work with an adolescent/young adult in individual therapy, providing some level of specialized parental coaching is inevitable. The exact nature of this coaching does vary a bit from family to family but usually means some additional meetings outside of your child’s individual sessions. The topics addressed during our time together are part of a program I’ve developed called The 13 Foundations and include:

  • How to respond to and curb disrespectful behavior
  • Determining whether your child’s behavior is normal or a sign of more serious issues
  • Implementing a system of consequences and reinforcements that actually works
  • Learning what behavior to respond to a what behavior to ignore
  • How to limit enabling unhealthy behavior and provide appropriate support instead
  • Therapeutic support for you as you cope with the tremendous difficulty of having a child in turmoil
  • Developing a parenting strategy that promotes resiliency and strength in your child
  • Dealing with any personal turmoil or negative impact on the relationship with your spouse/partner
  • The opportunity to have facilitated monthly meetings with other parents in similar situations to share ideas and provide support

Schedule Your Initial Consultation with Mason Today!

Competitive Amateur & Professional Athletes

In the world of athletic competition, the stigma associated with “getting help” remains a significant barrier. I have a treatment protocol designed to meet the needs of high school, collegiate and professional athletes that allows them to maintain focus on their life pursuit while receiving the care they need. Athletes are human beings first, so our priority is always to preserve, restore, and protect their quality of life beyond the playing field. But it’s an inescapable fact that the life of the competitive amateur and professional athlete can also be very different from the life of a “civilian” (non-athlete). It’s also undeniable that for an athlete, failing to receive proper treatment can carry significant consequences in the form lost scholarships, impaired earning potential, and damaged reputation. I understand the critical necessity of protecting an athlete’s confidentiality and how to constructively communicate with coaches, agents, athletic departments and sports management when it becomes necessary to do so.

  • Assuring the individual receives the right treatment to secure or maintain a scholarship
  • Dealing with the stress of a high public profile
  • Coordinating treatment with athletic departments, coaches, and agents
  • Performance anxiety
  • Generalized
  • Managing phobias over travel (i.e. flying)
  • Overcoming the trauma of failure in competition
  • Substance abuse
  • Anger control
  • Sexually abusive/problematic behavior
  • Dealing with Vicarious Parental Dreams Syndrome (VPDS).

Discretion and flexibility are a must in the world of competitive athletics and I have specialized protocols to promote additional levels of privacy.

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Schedule Your Initial Consultation with Mason Today!

Marijuana-specific Treatment

These are fascinating times for marijuana. America is in the middle of a grand social experiment unfolding in front of our eyes and here in Colorado, we have a front row seat. Unfortunately, the addictions treatment industry has lagged behind when it comes to recognizing how the treatment needs of primary cannabis abusers differ from individuals who abuse other classes of drugs. So while primary cannabis abusers need many of the same things offered in traditional substance abuse treatment, failure to respond to the unique aspects of this drug and the people who are abuse it results in substandard treatment. In response to these unique treatment needs, I’ve developed Sensible Treatment for Marijuana Issues (STMI). STMI is a comprehensive treatment program based on the idea that people seeking treatment for marijuana-related problems need a specific course of care that differs from other forms of drug treatment. If your child’s primary drug is marijuana or another cannabis-based product (i.e. wax, shatter, etc.), you’ve probably already discovered the limitations of traditional drug treatment. STMI begins with a thorough assessment, after which the client is assigned to one of three treatment levels that vary in length from 10 to 20 weeks.

Schedule Your Initial Consultation with Mason Today!

Sensible Treatment for Pornography-related Issues

Pornography has long ago moved out of the analog world of magazines and grainy video and into the digital age. Because of this uncomfortable relationship between technology and pornography, it’s difficult to discuss one without acknowledging the presence of the other. It’s never been easier to access pornography and the imagery can be intensely troubling. The ability to indulge any interest at any time and place can carry significant psychological and behavioral consequences especially for adolescents and young adults. Sensible Treatment for Pornography Issues (STPI) is a treatment protocol for individuals dealing with pornography related problems. STPI is a humane, strength-based approach to treatment of pornography problems that does not utilize shame in a misguided attempt to coerce individuals into changing. STMI begins with a thorough assessment, after which the client is assigned to one of two treatment levels that vary in length from 8 to 52 weeks.

Schedule Your Initial Consultation with Mason Today!

Treatment for illegal and sexually abusive behavior

It’s nearly a reflex when I meet my clients for the first time that I ask “How are you doing?” In most instances, it’s a social nicety, just a polite prelude to the seemingly more important conversations. But when I meet the youth and their families who come to me for offense specific treatment, I’m careful to avoid asking this question because I already know the two-word answer: Not good. By the time they reach me, the lives of the youth and that of their families have been turned upside down. They are not happy or excited about starting offense specific treatment and for many, the beginning of this journey represents some of the darkest days they’ve ever experienced.

There was a time, and not that long ago, when the value of offense specific treatment was easily offset against the harmful effects of the treatment itself. Fortunately, we’ve come a long way since then. We know more about what youth who abuse sexually need and don’t need from this process and sometimes the most helpful thing we can do is treat the youth and their families with dignity and kindness. There’s no way to get through offense specific treatment without dealing with the fact that shame and self-loathing often occur naturally in this process. Adding a pain tax to the already difficult situation doesn’t make the treatment any more effective.

I provide treatment from a place of compassion, which is an ingredient that cannot be considered optional. The ugliness of what we deal with is undeniable and the reality of the harm done difficult to face. But face it we will because it’s in being accountable that we can find the first steps toward healing. The point of offense specific treatment is to make sure that the abuse is never repeated again. But fulfilling this high calling means healing must occur, healing for those who were abused, healing for the people who love and care for everyone involved, healing for the larger community and yes, healing for those who commit the abuse. There are no categories of crime more feared and loathed than those involving abusive sexual behavior. The stigma for youth who commit these acts is enormous and the weight of a future where the only horizon is being ostracized and marginalized can be crushing. We cannot crush these kids. If we want them to refrain from ever committing another abusive act, then we must also accept that shame and guilt alone will be insufficient to the task. We must offer them the hope for a future and, dare we say it, a return to normal.

I accept that my approach with juveniles who have committed sex offense will make some uncomfortable. But that discomfort is usually born of an erroneous fear that treatment under humane conditions will be too “soft” and therefore ineffective. It’s easy to believe that treatment should be a partner to the punishment, that kids who commit sex offenses have no right to complain, and that they are simply “getting what they deserve”. Rest assured that there is nothing soft about offense specific treatment. To call this treatment difficult is to undersell the meaning of the word. Successfully completing this treatment will almost assuredly be the toughest, most demanding thing the youth has ever had to do during their as-of-yet short time on earth. And for many of the youth I’ve treated who later come back and check in as adults, this statement still applies. In this program, youth who commit sex offense do get exactly what, in the end, we want and hope they get. Put bluntly, they get exactly what they deserve: good treatment.

Schedule Your Initial Consultation with Mason Today!